All posts by raresivanoiu94

Celebrating and Surviving in North Korea

Longreads

North Koreans have also always enjoyed homemade moonshine, or nongtaegi. For the majority – especially those in the countryside with little or no disposable income – this remains the only option. Typically, homebrewing will be rudimentary, using corn, fruit or ginseng left to ferment in a bottle or jar, and buried under a pile of clothes for warmth.

A world away in the capital Pyongyang, the growing elite means that new bars and restaurants are springing up all the time. There are several microbrewery bars that produce their own lagers and ales on site.

Interviews with defectors also suggest that North Koreans are not serious consumers of marijuana. The drug of choice is, in fact, something much more pernicious: crystal meth. …Meth, known colloquially as eoreum or bingdu (both mean “ice”, a name by which the drug is also known in the US) is a drug unfortunately suited to the…

View original post 63 more words

Skull Rock (Joshua Tree National Park)

The (Semi-Regular) Roaming Lama

In Joshua Tree National Park there is a spectacular rock formation known as the Skull Rock. It is right off of the road but there is also a trail that runs through and around the area in the Mojave Desert. It’s a pretty easy trail but since you are in the middle of the dessert and its usually quite hot it is probably wise to stay relatively close to your car – or at least have plenty of water with you.

Skull rock (Joshua Tree National Park)

Skull Rock (Joshua Tree National Park)

I visited Joshua Tree back in October 2012. It was a really interesting place and the trees that make it famous were pretty amazing. It is a place I want to go back to now that I’ve got a few more years of practice with the camera. I think I could make some more interesting compositions of the trees – especially some silhouettes…

View original post 16 more words

A Chloe Caldwell Reading List

Longreads

On Tuesday, author Chloe Caldwell announced her second collection of essays, I’ll Tell You in Person: Essays on Intimacy & Identity, is forthcoming from indie publishers Emily Books/Coffee House Press in 2016. Caldwell is one of those writers who, once you encounter her work, inspires you to read everything she’s written, akin to Leslie Jamison or Cheryl Strayed (who happens to be her friend and mentor). My best friend introduced me to Chloe’s first collection of essays, Legs Get Led Astray, and it’s a book I carry with me when I’m in need of comfort. Caldwell’s second book, a novella called Women, garnered critical acclaim (and an Instagram shoutout from Lena Dunham). She’ll show you her demons if you’ll show her yours–her style is deeply personal, almost confessional, but Chloe never seems to write from a place of exhibitionism. She’s simply honest, and in an age of Internet posturing, that feels important. Chloe…

View original post 662 more words

Chores of the Childless

The Waiting

I have heard it said before that having a baby changes everything. I knew this was true when I found myself incredibly grateful to be able to sleep in until 7 a.m. on a Saturday morning. Pre-parent me would have died a little inside if someone had told her that there would come a day when she would view a 7 a.m. wake-up call or an unaccompanied trip to Target as major things to look forward to, but three years of parenthood does strange, awful things to our psyches.

Much like war.

We even start to miss some of the household chores we did before we spawned, surely a sign that we’re more foregone than we thought. Right now, if given the choice between mopping my kitchen floor without my three-year-old’s “help” and going to the spa, I’d choose the mop. I don’t even know who I am anymore.

Join me as I…

View original post 699 more words