All About Slugs (Not the Slimy Kind)

The Daily Post

When we start writing a new post, WordPress automatically creates a URL for the post using our blog’s address, the date, and post title. Great, now you don’t have to worry about your post’s URL, right? All taken care of.

Not quite. You don’t need to lose sleep over your post URLs, but paying some attention to the post slug — the bit of the URL after the address and date — can have a nice traffic payoff.

“I’m still not sure what a slug is!”

The slug is the bit of your post’s (or page’s) URL that describes what that specific post is about. Here’s the URL of this post, with the slug in bold:

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/08/15/post-slugs/

If I’d used the URL that WordPress auto-generated for me based on the post title, the slug would have been:

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2014/08/15/all-about-slugs-not-the-slimy-kind/

They both get the job done, but one…

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Things that Make Us Go “Click!”

The Daily Post

As you may have noticed, we love photography here at The Daily Post (and we have the free ebook to prove it!). Judging by the hundreds of responses to each of our Weekly Photo Challenges, so do you. But what is it about a scene, a place, or a moment that makes us reach for our cameras and snap an image? Regular Daily Post contributors Cheri, Krista, Michelle, and Ben share their photo-taking quirks.

Cheri Lucas Rowlands

When I go out and take photos, I tend to wander into quieter places. I’m not as comfortable pointing the camera into a crowd. I’m more interested in “indirect” portraits: a person caught off guard, looking away; an odd angle; an off-center composition. While I like photographing movement and landscapes, my favorite images are quiet and focused.

Holocaust Memorial-Cheri Lucas Rowlands

This shot at the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin shows a few examples of what I look for when out and…

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Ferguson: Ten Bloggers Speak Out

WordPress.com News

Many details about the violent death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, remain unclear. What is beyond doubt is the intensity of reactions to this story — in the media and in neighborhoods all over the US (and beyond). Here are ten personal perspectives on this event and its aftermath, from writers representing a diverse cross-section of the WordPress.com community.

14938226361_6a7a43dfda_oImage by Shawn Semmler (CC BY 2.0)

Gukira

Writer and scholar Keguro Macharia reacts with his usual incisiveness to one of the signature chants of post-Ferguson protests :

If “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” is an expression of “humanity,” as one tweet has it, we must ask for whom that humanity is available. In fact, the insistent repetition of “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” by black bodies across the U.S. might offer a less promising narrative: it might suggest the banality with which black life forms can never gain access to the vernaculars of the human.

hands up, don’t shoot

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“If this is a deterioration in my brain, then more, please.”

The Daily Post

Blogging hasn’t been around for that long, historically speaking, but it’s already transformed the way writers seek and find their audience and become members of larger communities.

Here’s Andrew Sullivan, one of the blogosphere’s earliest — and most successful — citizens, weighing in (back in 2010) on writing, interaction, and striking a balance between different modes of expression:

I’m a writer by profession and it’s totally clear to me that since I started blogging, the amount I write has increased exponentially, my daily interactions with the views of others have never been so frequent, the diversity of voices I engage with is far higher than in the pre-Internet age — and all this has helped me become more modest as a thinker, more open to error, less fixated on what I do know, and more respectful of what I don’t. If this is a deterioration in my brain, then…

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Community Pool

The Daily Post

Have you just published a new post and are dying for some feedback? Did you recently start your blog and could use some layout or design advice from your more seasoned peers?

Tap into the wisdom of The Daily Post blogging community and leave your question here in the comments. Others can then click through and offer input either on your site, or in the comments here (feel free to indicate which you’d prefer).

To help us make the Community Pool a productive space for discussion, here are some tips you might find useful:

TIP: To keep from losing your place in the comment thread while you visit others’ blogs, right-click on a link to open it in a new tab or window.

  • While you’re not required to, we encourage everyone who requests feedback to also reply to at least one or two other bloggers who need some help. Spread the love!
  • The Community Pool…

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Projects Around the World

WordPress.com News

We’re inspired to see bloggers doing things they love and using this platform to make their voices heard. Here’s a look at some interesting projects around the globe.

Russell Chapman: Telling the stories of Syrian refugees

Image by Russell ChapmanImage by Russell Chapman

Last year, photographer and writer Russell Chapman documented the conflict in Syria and spent time in Syrian refugee camps in Lebanon and Jordan. His book, Syria: Refugees and Rebels, compiles images of his time there. Russell is currently working on a project to tell the stories of Syrian refugees rebuilding their lives in Jordan.

Shannon Galpin: Empowering cyclists in Afghanistan

Image of the Afghan Women’s National Team by Deni BechardImage by Deni Bechard

Cyclist, women’s rights activist, and TEDx speaker Shannon Galpin — named a National Geographic Adventurer of the Year in 2013 — is the founder of Mountain2Mountain. Using the mountain bike as a vehicle for social justice in Afghanistan, she works on projects like supporting…

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What the Heck is Bloglovin’, and Do I Need It?

The Daily Post

Have you noticed images like this in the sidebars of blogs you read? Now you know what they're about. Have you noticed images like this in the sidebars of blogs you read and felt like you were missing something? Now you know what they’re about.

While catching up with your favorite bloggers, you’ve probably seen an invitation to “follow me on bloglovin’!” in more than one sidebar.

What is bloglovin’? Don’t you already follow the blog in your Reader? Do you really have to sign up for another online account? Let’s take a look at why lots of bloggers are signing on.

What is it?

Bloglovin‘ is a tool for keeping up with blogs — a way to manage feeds. Lots of bloggers turned to it after the demise of Google Reader. When you create an account there, you can follow any blogger on any platform, whether or not they’re also signed up. Then, you can log in and see the latest posts from all the blogs you follow in…

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